Accounts+ Annual Reports

BUSEGA SCOTLAND 3rd ANNUAL REPORT

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 24th January 2019

Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This third annual report covers the period from 1st December 2017 until 30th November 2018.

The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting four main projects:

Family Support
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project
Mayega Water Project

The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.

The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need because of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or another disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development

The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.

Acknowledgements

Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, volunteers, supporters, charities, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Switzerland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved. Support is given in many ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.

Busega Scotland believes it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has undertaken project work with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.

Busega Scotland has nine trustees. This number has not changed during the period of this report. Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to ten Tanzanian staff. It is important to acknowledge the positive impact of their dedicated service. In 2017-18 five British people visited Tanzania and made important contributions in supporting the project work. Overseas volunteers are self-funding.

Projects in Tanzania

Family Support – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, currently supporting about eighty families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting three women’s groups. The original project is based around the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new project supports agriculture in the village of Chole. A Baby Bundles scheme (equivalent to the Scottish Baby Boxes concept) operates in partnership with Bukumbi Mission Hospital supporting the most vulnerable mothers and babies.

Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently twenty-one residents. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health, education and personal development. In 2017-18 five young people left Mayega, and joined the Moving-on Project, and three children of primary school age have been admitted. One new child was admitted with very serious sight problems and has been receiving specialist treatment. A Saturday teacher and teaching assistant continue to improve educational attainment. Three children successfully passed their national primary school leaving examinations and are transferring to secondary school. A water supply has been established and a kitchen garden developed.

Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have finished school and left Mayega Children’s Centre. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment. In total, in 2018, there were twelve young people in college, following vocational courses in domestic electrical installation, motor mechanics and tailoring. A Moving-on student at Kalwande College was the student president. One young Mayega leaver left the Centre after failing her primary school leaving examinations and was not able to progress to secondary school. A bespoke support programme has been developed for her and she is learning tailoring skills.

Mayega Water Project – this has been developed under the auspices of the Mayega Water Group, involving representatives of Busega Scotland, Busega District Council and Mayega village leaders. Busega Scotland holds the chair of the group. Its purpose is to provide and develop clean, piped water supplies to Mayega. In the first year of the project the Council has connected the village to the mains water supply and Busega Scotland has provided connections into the Children’s Centre and Primary School. A partnership has been established with the Rotary Club of Elgin, who are actively supporting the Mayega Water Project.

Finance

Busega Scotland has supported the four Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many ways. There have been events (e.g. sponsored activities, a concert, coffee mornings and quiz night), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations from individuals, churches, groups and businesses. Some small grants have also been received.

Scottish costs have been minimised and comprise mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania.

Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.

One Tanzanian business supports Mayega Children’s Centre.

Busega Scotland trustees receive financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget. The Busega Scotland accounts will be submitted for independent review, in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator. They are then published on the Busega Scotland website.

Challenges and Opportunities

As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain and expand the sources of funding.

There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to increase recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising to cover shortfalls and for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place.

Mayega Children’s Centre and Family Support benefit particularly from recurrent donations, while Moving-on and the Mayega Water Project depend more on general fundraising and grants.

There has been success in raising specific funds for the eye treatment of a young girl at the Children’s Centre.

In 2019, there will be a continued emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be sought, in Tanzania and UK. This will include events to celebrate five years of Busega Scotland.

Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.

Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is through events, newsletters, presentations, through the website and by newspaper articles.

Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.

Busega Scotland has taken steps to make itself compliant with the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and has developed a Safeguarding policy, practices and procedures.

Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2019 and these include:

Family Support – support the second group at Igombe by welcoming more women and increasing the capital available for business loans. Other opportunities will be developed as funds allow.

Mayega Children’s Centre – a plan has been agreed to build a kitchen. A sick bay/visitor’s accommodation will be created in an existing building. The garden will be developed to grow young trees to improve the environment of the Centre. It is likely that two more children will be admitted, so reaching capacity and maintaining one bed for an emergency. It is intended to increase learning support for children at the Centre. Work is underway to establish a library at Mayega Primary School and this will assist the children from the Centre who attend there.

Moving-on Project – no young people will leave the Centre to join Moving-on in 2019 as there are no school leavers. Seven college graduates will receive assistance in finding employment and establishing their independence. The five young people who remain in training will continue to receive support.

Mayega Water Project – the Children’s Centre will be a beneficiary from the project through the construction of the kitchen and the standpipe programme will be completed, with one installed in each of Mayega’s sub-villages and at the dispensary. There will be continued work to obtain a grant to build toilets at Mayega Primary School, improve sanitation in the village and for a health and hygiene education programme. A partnership is being established with the Rotary Clubs of Elgin and Igoma for these purposes.

Conclusions

The fourth year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success.

The charity has grown its profile, developed its partnerships and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.

It has expanded its activities, so continues to address and achieve its charitable purposes very effectively.

Its finances are well managed and are reported in detail to trustees.

Productive methods of partnership working have continued in two vastly different working environments.

The charity has created positive collaborations, in achieving both its charitable purposes and adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.

The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the public in a very direct and accountable manner.

Press coverage continues to be good, with recent reports in Moray and in Edinburgh.

A Certificate of Appreciation was awarded to Busega Scotland, by Busega District Council and by the President’s representative in Busega District.

Busega Scotland continues to be a credible and respected charity at home and overseas, with a growing reputation.

In 2019, we are planning a programme of events to celebrate who we are, what we have achieved and what more we can do.

John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 12th December 2018.

Accounts summary 1st December 2017 to 30th November 2018

Accounts summary 1st December 2016 to 30th November 2017

 

 

BUSEGA SCOTLAND ANNUAL REPORT JANUARY 2018

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 25th January 2018

Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This second annual report covers the period from 1st December 2016 until 30th November 2017.

The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting three main projects:

Family Support
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project

The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.

The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need because of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or another disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development

The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.

Acknowledgements

Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, volunteers, supporters, charities, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved. Support is given in many ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.

Busega Scotland believes that it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has undertaken project work with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Knockando Woolmill Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.

Busega Scotland has nine trustees. This number has not changed during the period of this report. Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to nine Tanzanian staff, working in the three projects. In 2016-17 seven British people visited Tanzania to support the project work. Overseas volunteers are self-funding.

Projects in Tanzania

Family Support – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, supporting about one hundred and five families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting three women’s groups. The original project is based on the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new projects support agriculture in the village of Chole. A Baby Bundles scheme has commenced in partnership with Bukumbi Mission Hospital. It is based on the Scottish Baby Boxes concept and is supporting the most vulnerable mothers and babies.

Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently twenty-three residents. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health and education. In 2016-17 two young people left Mayega and joined the Moving-on Project and nine children of nursery and primary school age have been admitted. A Saturday teacher has been appointed to improve educational attainment.

Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have completed their education and left the Mayega Children’s Centre. Two young people joined the project in January 2017. In total, there are now eight young people in college, following vocational courses in domestic electrical installation and motor mechanics. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment.

Finance

Busega Scotland has supported the three Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many ways. There have been events (e.g. sponsored events, a concert and quiz nights), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations from individuals and groups.

Local costs have been minimised, and comprised mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania.

Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.

There has been some success in raising funds in Tanzania itself with one charity aiding Family Support and a business supporting Mayega Children’s Centre. One UK charity has made a significant donation to the Moving-on Project.

Busega Scotland trustees receive financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget. The Busega Scotland accounts will be submitted for independent review in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator. They will then be published on the Busega Scotland website.

Challenges and Opportunities

As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain and expand fundraising.

Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is by newsletters, presentations and through a website and Facebook page.

Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.

There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to seek recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place.

In 2018 there will be a greater emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be developed, in Tanzania and UK. Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.

Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2018 and these include:

Family Support – support the second women’s group at Chole by increasing the capital available for business loans and to expand the Baby Bundles project.

Mayega Children’s Centre – a plan has been agreed to install a piped water supply and to develop a kitchen garden. Five new children will be admitted.

Moving-on Project – establish the four new students in their college courses and later assist seven college graduates in finding employment.

Conclusions

The second year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success. The charity has grown its profile and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.

It is addressing and achieving its charitable purposes. Its finances are well managed and are reported in detail to trustees.

Productive methods of partnership working have continued in two vastly different working environments. The charity has created positive collaborations, in achieving both its charitable purposes and in adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.

The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the public in a very direct and accountable manner. Press coverage continues to be good and the charity’s work was recognised by an invitation to the Queen’s Garden Party in Edinburgh. Busega Scotland is a credible and respected charity at home and overseas.

John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 27th December 2017


Accounts summary 1stJuly  2015 to 30th November 2016

 

BUSEGA SCOTLAND ANNUAL REPORT JANUARY  2017

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 1st February 2017
Introduction
Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This report covers the period from registration until 31st December 2016. It is Busega Scotland’s first annual report. The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting three main projects:
Family Support Project
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project
The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.
The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need by reason of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or other disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development
The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.
Acknowledgements
Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, supporters, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved.
Support is given in many different ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.
Busega Scotland believes that it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has project work underway with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Knockando Woolmill Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.
At its registration Busega Scotland had ten trustees. Two trustees have since resigned and another has been appointed.
Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to seven Tanzanian staff, working in the three projects. In 2016 two British couples visited Tanzania to support the project work. Such overseas volunteers are self-funding.
Projects in Tanzania
Family Support Project – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, supporting about seventy families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting two women’s groups. The original project is based on the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new project, which started in November, supports agriculture in the village of Chole.
Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for up to twenty-four vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently fourteen residents, as older members have moved to the Moving-on Project. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health and education. In 2016 a second building was completed. This has a community room for dining, schoolwork and social activities. The physical security of the site was also improved by erecting a perimeter fence.
Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have completed their secondary education and left the Mayega Children’s Centre. Five young people joined the project in 2016. In total, there are now seven young people in college, following vocational courses in primary teaching, secretarial studies and motor mechanics. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment.
Finance
Busega Scotland supports the three Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many different ways. There have been events (e.g. a sponsored walk and quiz nights), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations and grants.
In the period 1st July 2015 to 30th November 2016 Busega Scotland had an income of £35,054. This included Gift Aid claimed on appropriate donations. The expenditure in the same period was £28,774, with the vast majority of the funds utilised in Tanzania.
Local costs were minimised, and comprised mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania. There was a one off legal fee in setting up the Busega Scotland bank account. One loan for a capital project was received and paid back.
Brexit has impacted on the value of funds transferred, with a 20% fall in the value of the pound sterling against the Tanzanian shilling. Busega Scotland has been careful to take this factor into account when transferring money.
Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.
Busega Scotland holds funds in a Tanzanian bank account. At 30th November there was a balance of 9,038,367/- (Tanzanian shillings). That is equivalent to £3,615, at a nominal exchange rate of 2,500/- per pound sterling.
Busega Scotland trustees receive monthly financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget.
The Busega Scotland accounts have been submitted for independent review in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator.
Challenges and Opportunities
As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain fundraising, and the impact of Brexit is an additional pressure.
Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is by newsletters, presentations and through a website.
Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.
There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to seek recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place. The current balance of income over expenditure provides some security for regular spending.
In 2017 there will be a greater emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be developed. Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.
Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2017 and these include:
Family Support Project – consolidating of the project at Chole by increasing the capital available to the women’s group for business loans.
Mayega Children’s Centre – a specific development plan has been agreed to improve educational attainment (including dedicated teacher time at the centre), to admit and integrate new children and install a piped water supply.
Moving-on Project – establish three new students in their college courses.
Conclusions
The first year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success.
The charity has an increasing profile and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.
It is addressing and achieving its charitable purposes.
Its finances are well managed and are reported to trustees on a regular basis.
Productive methods of partnership working have been established in two vastly different working environments.
The charity has created positive collaborations in achieving both its charitable purposes and in adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.
The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the general public in a very direct and accountable manner.
Press coverage has been good.
Busega Scotland has become a credible and respected charity at home and overseas.
John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 17th January 2017.