Accounts+ Annual Reports

Charity registration number: SCO46101

 

 Busega Scotland

Annual Report and Financial Statements

For the Year Ended 30th November 2019

 

Contents

Reference and Administrative Details………………………………………………………3

 Trustees’ Report……………………..………………………………………………..…4 – 8

 Independent Examiner’s Report………………………………………………………….9

 Receipts and Payments Account…………………………………………………..………10

 Balance Sheet………………………………………………………………………………11

 Notes to the Financial Statements…….…………………………………………….12 to 13

 The following page does not form part of the statutory financial statements:

 Statement of financial activities per fund….………………………………………………14

Structure, governance and management ………………………………………… 15

Reference and Administrative Detail

Charity Name

Busega Scotlan

Charity Registration Number

SCO4610

Trustees

John Carney, Chair

Christine Carney

Christopher Banks, Treasurer

Michael McClafferty, Secretary (resigned 24th January 2019)

Jenny Wallen, Secretary (appointed 24th January 2019)

Andy Lees

Christine Petrie

Vincenzo Main, (appointed 16th May 2019)

Anne Grant, (appointed 16th May 2019)

Margaret Forrest, (appointed 16th May 2019)

Sue Taylor, (resigned 24th January 2019)

Colin Sanders, (resigned 24th January 2019)

 

 

 

Trustees’ Report

Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This fourth annual report covers the period from 1st December 2018 until 30th November 2019. The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, involving five main projects:

 Family Support

Mayega Children’s Centre

Moving-on

School Development

Mayega Water Project

 The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.

 The purposes of Busega Scotland are:

The prevention or relief of poverty

The relief of those in need because of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or another disadvantage

The advancement of health

The advancement of education

The advancement of citizenship or community development

 

The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.

 Acknowledgements

 Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, volunteers, supporters, charities, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, England, Switzerland, Tanzania and other countries.  Support is given in many ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.

 Busega Scotland believes in making a positive contribution to its host community of Moray.  It has undertaken project work with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Turning Point Scotland, Lhanbryde and Mosstowie Primary Schools, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.

 Busega Scotland has nine trustees but no paid employees in the UK.  It pays allowances to ten Tanzanian staff and acknowledges the positive impact of their dedicated service.  In 2018-19 five British people visited Tanzania and made important contributions to the project work.  Such overseas volunteers are all self-funding.

 Progress in 2018/19

 Family Support – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in three locations.  It has supported about one hundred and twenty-five families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and has assisted four women’s groups.  These groups are now independent of Busega Scotland.  Family Support is committed to self-determination, sustainability and continuous improvement.  A women’s conference was held in November to help plan the future of the project.  For the first time Family Support has engaged with an individual family.  Without such help the risk to those children would be significantly increased.

 Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for vulnerable children and young people, in dormitory accommodation.  A teacher has been appointed to work in the Centre in the afternoons and holidays.  This is a step-change in educational support and attainment is improving.  The children are engaging with a learning culture and this was enhanced by a volunteer teacher from Scotland.  The Big Busega Parties proect (ending with a Mayega party) was aimed at improving the children’s self-esteem and sense of belonging.  The dormitories now have showers, wash hand basins and flushing toilets and a kitchen has been constructed.

 Moving-on Project – the aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment for young people leaving Mayega Children’s Centre.  Accomodation, social, emotional and practical support is provided.  There were four young people in college in 2019, following vocational courses in domestic electrical installation, motor mechanics and tailoring.  Six motor mechanics were given support to find employment, following their graduation in 2018.  Preparations are being made for two young people at Mayega to join Moving-on.  They have completed their secondary education.

 School Development – the children from the Mayega Centre attend Mayega Primary School.  The school has received significant support from Busega Scotland, including a teacher shared with the Children’s Centre.  English reading schemes were sent from Lhanbryde Primary School and their implementation supported by the Scottish volunteer teacher.  A library has been established to house the reading schemes and many reading books in English and Kiswahili.  Sports equipment has been donated and strips for the football and netball teams.  The school’s Standard 7 examination results have improved from 59th in the district in 2018 to 8th this year (6541 to 871 nationally).

 Mayega Water and Sanitation – this is being developed under the auspices of the Mayega Water and Sanitation Group (MWSG).  The group is chaired by Busega Scotland.  The project aims to make clean water available across the village and to improve sanitation.  The village has achieved a mains water supply, nine water distribution points (DPs) and a kitchen built at the Children’s Centre.  The MWSG has been working on a Rotary International application to increase the number of DPs, build school toilets and pilot family toilets.  All will be supported by education and training programmes.  The Rotary Club in Elgin and Igoma are project partners.

 Finance

 Busega Scotland has supported the five Tanzanian projects by fundraising in different ways.  There have been events (e.g. Kiltwalk, a concert, a dinner, a quiz night and talks) and a pop-up charity shop.  One-off and regular donations are made by individuals, churches, groups and businesses.

 An IT company in London, businesses in Moray and Edinburgh, Rotary District 1010 and churches in Basel, Suffolk and Moray have been particularly supportive.  A Tanzanian business supports Mayega Children’s Centre.  Scottish costs are minimised and comprise mainly of expenses for fundraising activities (with these generally sponsored) and charges for money transferred to Tanzania.

 Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need.  Transfers are sanctioned in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues.  Expenditure varies month by month.  Financial procedures govern transactions in Scotland and Tanzania.

 Busega Scotland has office facilities in Elgin, provided by Aberlour Child Care Trust, and an office in Mwanza, provided by the Shaloom Care House Project.  Both are free of charge.

 The Tanzanian accounts were audited by registered Certified Public Accountants and found to be in order.

 In Scotland, Busega Scotland trustees receive financial reports.  They cover UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budgets.  The Scottish accounts are submitted annually for independent review.  This is in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR).

 Summary reports on the Scottish and Tanzanian accounts have been published on the Busega Scotland website – https://busegascotland.co.uk/annual-accounts/

 Details of Busega Scotland’s annual reporting to OSCR can be found on their website – https://www.oscr.org.uk/about-charities/search-the-register/charity-details?number=46101

 Challenges and Opportunities

 As with any charitable organisation there is a need to secure funding to meet expenditure.

 The financial model adopted by Busega Scotland is meeting current needs – recurrent donations underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising covers shortfalls, capital spend and larger costs.  Major expenditure is only sanctioned when specific funding is in place.

 Mayega Children’s Centre and Family Support benefit from recurrent donations, while Moving-on, School Development and the Mayega Water and Sanitation depend more on general fundraising and grants.  The relationship with Rotary is developing and working to expand the Mayega Water and Sanitation Project.  The fundraising and awareness raising in 2019 (linked to the 5th anniversary of Busega Scotland) was particularly successful – the unique Big Busega Parties project had support from every continent.

 A larger financial reserve will be required to fulfil Busega Scotland commitments to Mayega Children’s Centre, as laid out in a Memorandum of Understanding being worked on with Busega District Council.

 Scottish costs continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.

 Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania – to inform supporters, maintain their loyalty and to grow the base of support.  Communications is through events, newsletters, talks, the website and by newspaper articles.

 The Latest News page of the website is kept regularly up to date

https://busegascotland.co.uk

 Operational priorities for 2020

 Family Support – following the women’s conference consideration is being given to establishing new groups in Igombe, Chole and Mayega.  Further work is needed to secure the welfare of the vulnerable family in Buswelu.

Mayega Children’s Centre – maintenance work will be carried out on the dormitory building and security fence.  The buildings have been made ready for mains electricity and a connection will be established once the supply reaches Mayega village.  A tree garden is planned to add to the trees planted in 2019.  A Memorandum of Understanding is being prepared to govern the relationship with Busega District Council.  It is proposed that Busega Scotland formally manages and operates the Centre on behalf of the Council.  An agreement has also been reached with Busega District to admit up to six new children.

 Moving-on Project – two young people will leave the Centre to join Moving-on and commence college courses.  Four college graduates will receive assistance in finding employment and becoming independent.  The graduate mechanic will also complete a driving course.

 School development – further support will be provided to maximise the benefit of the English language reading schemes and to ensure the best use of the teacher shared between Mayega Primary School and the Children’s Centre.

 Mayega Water Project – the Rotary International application will be submitted early in 2020.  If successful, the construction of DPs, school and family toilets will start later in the year.

 General – Staff development will continue in Tanzania.  This will cover the themes of continuous improvement, ‘getting it right first time, every time’ and working across cultural boundaries.  Improved terms and conditions for the staff will be worked on.  Safeguarding policy, practices and procedures will continue to be implemented.

 Conclusions

 The fifth year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success.  The charity has grown its profile and developed its partnerships and projects.  It has expanded its activities, so continues to address and achieve its charitable purposes very effectively.

 Busega Scotland had its best fundraising year so far.  Its finances are well managed, subject to external scrutiny and are reported in detail to trustees.

 Productive partnership working has been developed in Tanzania.  The charity has also created positive collaborations at home and add to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.

 The work of Busega Scotland is communicated to trustees, supporters and the general public in a very direct and accountable manner.  Press coverage continues to be good.  Recent reports have appeared in the Northern Scot and in the North of Scotland Rotary magazine.

 Busega Scotland continues to be a credible and respected charity at home and overseas and has a growing reputation.

 John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland

13th December 2019

Independent Examiner’s Report to the Trustees of Busega Scotland

 I report on the accounts of the charity for the year ended 30 November 2019 which are set out on pages 10 to 13.

Respective responsibilities of trustees and examiners

The charity’s trustees are responsible for the preparation of the accounts in accordance

with the terms of the Charities and Trustee Investment (Scotland) Act 2005 and the Charities

Accounts (Scotland) Regulations 2006. The charity trustees consider that the audit requirement

of Regulation 10(1) (d) of the 2006 Accounts Regulations does not apply. It is my responsibility

to examine the accounts as required under section 44(1) (c) of the Act and to state whether

particular matters have come to my attention.

 Basis of independent examiner’s report

My examination is carried out in accordance with Regulation 11 of the 2006 Accounts Regulations.

An examination includes a review of the accounting records kept by the charity and a

comparison of the accounts presented with those records. It also includes consideration of

any unusual items or disclosures in the accounts, and seeks explanations from the trustees

concerning any such matters. The procedures undertaken do not provide all the evidence

that would be required in an audit, and consequently I do not express an audit opinion on the

view given by the accounts.

 Independent examiner’s statement

In the course of my examination, no matter has come to my attention

 1. which gives me reasonable cause to believe that in any material respect the requirements:

• to keep accounting records in accordance with Section 44(1) (a) of the 2005 Act and

Regulation 4 of the 2006 Accounts Regulations

• to prepare accounts which accord with the accounting records and comply with

Regulation 9 of the 2006 Accounts Regulations

            have not been met, or

 2. to which, in my opinion, attention should be drawn in order to enable a proper

understanding of the accounts to be reached.

 ……………………………………..………Nathan Snyder

 

 Receipts and Payments Account for the Year ended 30 November 2019 

 

 

Notes

Unrestricted

Funds

Restricted Funds

Total Funds 2019

Total Funds

2018

 

 

£

 

£

£

Incoming resources

 

 

 

 

 

Incoming resources from

  generated funds

    Activities for generating funds

 

 

1

 

 

43,965

 

 

 

 

43,965

 

 

38,473

Total incoming resources

 

43,965

43,965

38,473

 

 

Resources expended

 

 

 

 

 

Costs of generating funds

 

 

 

 

 

    Costs of generating voluntary

        Income

 

2

 

1,942

 

 

1,942

 

2,064

        Charitable Activities

 

37,392

37,392

32,405

Total resources expended

 

39,334

39,334

34,469

 

 

Net movements in funds

 

4,631

4,631

   4,004

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reconciliation of Funds

 

 

 

 

 

Total funds brought forward

 

10,429

10,429

   6,425

Total funds carried forward

 

15,060

15,060

10,429

 

 All incoming resources and resources expended derive from continuing activities.

 The charity has no recognised gains or losses for the year other than the results above.

 

The notes on pages 12 and 13 form an integral part of these financial statements.

 Balance Sheet as at 30 November 2019 

2019

2018

 

£

£

Current assets

 

 

Cash at bank and in hand

15,060

10,429

Net assets

15,060

10,429

 

 

 

The funds of the charity:

 

 

Restricted funds

 

 

Unrestricted funds

Unrestricted income funds

 

15,060

 

10,429

Total charity funds

15,060

10,429

 

 

 

Approved by the Board on 14th January 2020 and signed on its behalf by:…………………………………………..Christopher Banks

Treasurer

 The notes on pages 8 and 9 form an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 Notes to the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 November 2019

 

1

Voluntary income

 

Unrestricted Funds

£

 

Restricted Funds

£

Total Funds 2019

£

Total Funds

2018

£

 

Donations and legacies

 

 

 

 

 

Donations

33,958

33,958

24,102

 

Gift Aid

3,747

3,747

3,635

 

Fundraising

6,260

6,260

10,736

 

 

43,965

43,965

38,473

 

2

Total resources expended

 

 

 

 

 

Costs of

Fund Raising

£

 

 

Total

£

 

Total

2018

£

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of goods sold

1,095

1,095

1,809

 

Hall Rental

222

222

255

 

Trustee Loan repayment

625

625

           

 

 

1,942

1,942

2,064

 

 

3

Trustees’ remuneration and expenses

 

No trustees received any remuneration during the year.

 

 

 

4

Related parties

 

Controlling entity.

 

The charity is controlled by the trustees.

 

 

5

Charitable Activities

 

All charitable activities relate to transfers made to Tanzania and the associated transfer costs.

 

 

 

 Notes to the Financial Statements for the Year Ended 30 November 2019 

………………..continued

 

6

Analysis of funds

At 1

December 2018

 

Incoming

resources

 

Resources

expended

At 30

November

2019

 

 

£

£

£

£

 

General Funds

Unrestricted income fund

 

10,429

 

43,965

 

39,334

 

15,060

 

 

10,429

43,965

39,334

15,060

 

7

Net assets by fund

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrestricted

Funds

 

Restricted

Funds

Total

Funds

2019

Total

Funds

2017

 

 

£

£

£

£

 

Current assets

15,060

15,060

10,429

 

Net assets

15,060

15,060

10,429

 

 Statement of financial activities by fund for the Year Ended 30 November 2019

 

 

 

Unrestricted

Income fund

2019

Unrestricted Income fund

2018

 

 

 

£

£

 

Incoming resources

 

 

 

 

Incoming resources from generated funds

  Voluntary income

 

 

43,965

 

38,473

 

Total incoming resources

 

43,965

38,473

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources expended

 

 

 

 

Costs of generating funds

 

1,942

2,064

 

  Charitable activities

 

37,392

32,405

 

Total resources expended

 

39,334

34,469

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net movements in funds

 

 

 

4,631

4,004

 

Reconciliation of funds

Total funds brought forward

 

 

10,429

 

6,425

 

Total funds carried forward

 

15,060

10,429

 

 This page does not form part of the statutory financial statements.

Structure, Governance and Management

Type of governing documentConstitution of Busega Scotland as a Scottish Incorporated Charitable Organisation (SCIO).

Trustee recruitment and appointmentPotential trustees are identified by personal recommendation from existing board members. A recommendation is based on what is known about the potential trustee and the knowledge, skills and experience required by the board at that time. With board approval, the potential trustee is contacted and interviewed by the Chair of Busega Scotland. A report is then circulated to trustees, and the nominee can be invited to a subsequent board meeting as a guest. This is not an interview but an opportunity for the potential trustee to meet members, get a feel of what board meetings are like and to conclude about joining the board. If board and prospective trustee agree to proceed then a letter of appointment, a statement of responsibilities and code of conduct will be sent to the new member.

Policy on reservesThe sources of income available to Busega Scotland are fragile. They may be regular or one-off donations or the proceeds of fundraising. The charity seeks to maximise income from regular donations for recurrent expenditure, and supplement this by fundraising to meet shortfalls and for specified fixed cost projects. The policy on reserves applies to recurrent expenditure. As income is not guaranteed, it is important to have enough reserves to tide Busega Scotland over lean periods when additional funds will have to be sought. The trustees need to keep the level of reserves under regular review (annually or when significant changes occur) and to determine the level of reserves required.  The monitoring of the level of reserves is vested in the treasurer, who must advise trustees if the funds available are likely to go below the level of reserves required.

Reserves will include both general income and income received for specific purposes. The level of reserves will cover recurrent expenditure over a three-month period. They will be quoted in £ sterling and include funds held in both in the UK and Tanzanian bank accounts. They are based on the evidence of historic trends and known additional commitments with a margin to cover unforeseen additional costs such as currency exchange rate fluctuations and inflation.

 

Declaration – The trustees declare that they have approved the trustees’ report above.

 

Signed on behalf of the charity’s trustees

 

Signature(s)

 

 

Full name(s)

 

 

Position (e.g. Chair)

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

 Tanzanian Bank Account Audit Certificate 31.12.18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUSEGA SCOTLAND 3rd ANNUAL REPORT

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 24th January 2019

Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This third annual report covers the period from 1st December 2017 until 30th November 2018.

The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting four main projects:

Family Support
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project
Mayega Water Project

The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.

The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need because of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or another disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development

The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.

Acknowledgements

Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, volunteers, supporters, charities, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Switzerland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved. Support is given in many ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.

Busega Scotland believes it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has undertaken project work with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.

Busega Scotland has nine trustees. This number has not changed during the period of this report. Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to ten Tanzanian staff. It is important to acknowledge the positive impact of their dedicated service. In 2017-18 five British people visited Tanzania and made important contributions in supporting the project work. Overseas volunteers are self-funding.

Projects in Tanzania

Family Support – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, currently supporting about eighty families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting three women’s groups. The original project is based around the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new project supports agriculture in the village of Chole. A Baby Bundles scheme (equivalent to the Scottish Baby Boxes concept) operates in partnership with Bukumbi Mission Hospital supporting the most vulnerable mothers and babies.

Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently twenty-one residents. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health, education and personal development. In 2017-18 five young people left Mayega, and joined the Moving-on Project, and three children of primary school age have been admitted. One new child was admitted with very serious sight problems and has been receiving specialist treatment. A Saturday teacher and teaching assistant continue to improve educational attainment. Three children successfully passed their national primary school leaving examinations and are transferring to secondary school. A water supply has been established and a kitchen garden developed.

Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have finished school and left Mayega Children’s Centre. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment. In total, in 2018, there were twelve young people in college, following vocational courses in domestic electrical installation, motor mechanics and tailoring. A Moving-on student at Kalwande College was the student president. One young Mayega leaver left the Centre after failing her primary school leaving examinations and was not able to progress to secondary school. A bespoke support programme has been developed for her and she is learning tailoring skills.

Mayega Water Project – this has been developed under the auspices of the Mayega Water Group, involving representatives of Busega Scotland, Busega District Council and Mayega village leaders. Busega Scotland holds the chair of the group. Its purpose is to provide and develop clean, piped water supplies to Mayega. In the first year of the project the Council has connected the village to the mains water supply and Busega Scotland has provided connections into the Children’s Centre and Primary School. A partnership has been established with the Rotary Club of Elgin, who are actively supporting the Mayega Water Project.

Finance

Busega Scotland has supported the four Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many ways. There have been events (e.g. sponsored activities, a concert, coffee mornings and quiz night), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations from individuals, churches, groups and businesses. Some small grants have also been received.

Scottish costs have been minimised and comprise mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania.

Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.

One Tanzanian business supports Mayega Children’s Centre.

Busega Scotland trustees receive financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget. The Busega Scotland accounts will be submitted for independent review, in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator. They are then published on the Busega Scotland website.

Challenges and Opportunities

As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain and expand the sources of funding.

There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to increase recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising to cover shortfalls and for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place.

Mayega Children’s Centre and Family Support benefit particularly from recurrent donations, while Moving-on and the Mayega Water Project depend more on general fundraising and grants.

There has been success in raising specific funds for the eye treatment of a young girl at the Children’s Centre.

In 2019, there will be a continued emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be sought, in Tanzania and UK. This will include events to celebrate five years of Busega Scotland.

Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.

Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is through events, newsletters, presentations, through the website and by newspaper articles.

Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.

Busega Scotland has taken steps to make itself compliant with the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and has developed a Safeguarding policy, practices and procedures.

Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2019 and these include:

Family Support – support the second group at Igombe by welcoming more women and increasing the capital available for business loans. Other opportunities will be developed as funds allow.

Mayega Children’s Centre – a plan has been agreed to build a kitchen. A sick bay/visitor’s accommodation will be created in an existing building. The garden will be developed to grow young trees to improve the environment of the Centre. It is likely that two more children will be admitted, so reaching capacity and maintaining one bed for an emergency. It is intended to increase learning support for children at the Centre. Work is underway to establish a library at Mayega Primary School and this will assist the children from the Centre who attend there.

Moving-on Project – no young people will leave the Centre to join Moving-on in 2019 as there are no school leavers. Seven college graduates will receive assistance in finding employment and establishing their independence. The five young people who remain in training will continue to receive support.

Mayega Water Project – the Children’s Centre will be a beneficiary from the project through the construction of the kitchen and the standpipe programme will be completed, with one installed in each of Mayega’s sub-villages and at the dispensary. There will be continued work to obtain a grant to build toilets at Mayega Primary School, improve sanitation in the village and for a health and hygiene education programme. A partnership is being established with the Rotary Clubs of Elgin and Igoma for these purposes.

Conclusions

The fourth year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success.

The charity has grown its profile, developed its partnerships and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.

It has expanded its activities, so continues to address and achieve its charitable purposes very effectively.

Its finances are well managed and are reported in detail to trustees.

Productive methods of partnership working have continued in two vastly different working environments.

The charity has created positive collaborations, in achieving both its charitable purposes and adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.

The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the public in a very direct and accountable manner.

Press coverage continues to be good, with recent reports in Moray and in Edinburgh.

A Certificate of Appreciation was awarded to Busega Scotland, by Busega District Council and by the President’s representative in Busega District.

Busega Scotland continues to be a credible and respected charity at home and overseas, with a growing reputation.

In 2019, we are planning a programme of events to celebrate who we are, what we have achieved and what more we can do.

John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 12th December 2018.

Accounts summary 1st December 2017 to 30th November 2018

Accounts summary 1st December 2016 to 30th November 2017

 

 

BUSEGA SCOTLAND ANNUAL REPORT JANUARY 2018

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 25th January 2018

Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This second annual report covers the period from 1st December 2016 until 30th November 2017.

The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting three main projects:

Family Support
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project

The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.

The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need because of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or another disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development

The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.

Acknowledgements

Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, volunteers, supporters, charities, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved. Support is given in many ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.

Busega Scotland believes that it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has undertaken project work with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Knockando Woolmill Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.

Busega Scotland has nine trustees. This number has not changed during the period of this report. Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to nine Tanzanian staff, working in the three projects. In 2016-17 seven British people visited Tanzania to support the project work. Overseas volunteers are self-funding.

Projects in Tanzania

Family Support – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, supporting about one hundred and five families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting three women’s groups. The original project is based on the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new projects support agriculture in the village of Chole. A Baby Bundles scheme has commenced in partnership with Bukumbi Mission Hospital. It is based on the Scottish Baby Boxes concept and is supporting the most vulnerable mothers and babies.

Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently twenty-three residents. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health and education. In 2016-17 two young people left Mayega and joined the Moving-on Project and nine children of nursery and primary school age have been admitted. A Saturday teacher has been appointed to improve educational attainment.

Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have completed their education and left the Mayega Children’s Centre. Two young people joined the project in January 2017. In total, there are now eight young people in college, following vocational courses in domestic electrical installation and motor mechanics. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment.

Finance

Busega Scotland has supported the three Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many ways. There have been events (e.g. sponsored events, a concert and quiz nights), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations from individuals and groups.

Local costs have been minimised, and comprised mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania.

Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.

There has been some success in raising funds in Tanzania itself with one charity aiding Family Support and a business supporting Mayega Children’s Centre. One UK charity has made a significant donation to the Moving-on Project.

Busega Scotland trustees receive financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget. The Busega Scotland accounts will be submitted for independent review in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator. They will then be published on the Busega Scotland website.

Challenges and Opportunities

As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain and expand fundraising.

Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is by newsletters, presentations and through a website and Facebook page.

Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.

There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to seek recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place.

In 2018 there will be a greater emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be developed, in Tanzania and UK. Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.

Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2018 and these include:

Family Support – support the second women’s group at Chole by increasing the capital available for business loans and to expand the Baby Bundles project.

Mayega Children’s Centre – a plan has been agreed to install a piped water supply and to develop a kitchen garden. Five new children will be admitted.

Moving-on Project – establish the four new students in their college courses and later assist seven college graduates in finding employment.

Conclusions

The second year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success. The charity has grown its profile and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.

It is addressing and achieving its charitable purposes. Its finances are well managed and are reported in detail to trustees.

Productive methods of partnership working have continued in two vastly different working environments. The charity has created positive collaborations, in achieving both its charitable purposes and in adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.

The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the public in a very direct and accountable manner. Press coverage continues to be good and the charity’s work was recognised by an invitation to the Queen’s Garden Party in Edinburgh. Busega Scotland is a credible and respected charity at home and overseas.

John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 27th December 2017


Accounts summary 1stJuly  2015 to 30th November 2016

 

BUSEGA SCOTLAND ANNUAL REPORT JANUARY  2017

Prepared for the Annual General Meeting on 1st February 2017
Introduction
Busega Scotland became a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation on 4th November 2015. This report covers the period from registration until 31st December 2016. It is Busega Scotland’s first annual report. The charity is based in Moray and works in partnership with non-governmental organisations and local government in Tanzania, supporting three main projects:
Family Support Project
Mayega Children’s Centre
Moving-on Project
The projects are based in the Mwanza and Simiyu Regions of Tanzania.
The purposes of Busega Scotland are:
The prevention or relief of poverty
The relief of those in need by reason of age, ill-health, disability, financial hardship or other disadvantage
The advancement of health
The advancement of education
The advancement of citizenship or community development
The purposes are achieved by addressing the assessed needs of disadvantaged Tanzanian communities, through setting-up and managing projects and by making grants, and where appropriate loans, to individuals, or charitable associations, bodies and organisations in Tanzania.
Acknowledgements
Busega Scotland wishes to record its thanks for the many contributions made to its work by trustees, supporters, businesses, churches and organisations in Scotland, Tanzania and other countries. Without this support the purposes of the organisation would not be achieved.
Support is given in many different ways; financial donations and benefit in kind, organising events and providing advice, guidance, time and expertise.
Busega Scotland believes that it is important to make a positive contribution to its host community of Moray and has project work underway with Aberlour Child Care Trust, Knockando Woolmill Trust, Lhanbryde Primary School, the Rotary Club of Elgin and Moray College UHI – University of the Highlands and Islands.
At its registration Busega Scotland had ten trustees. Two trustees have since resigned and another has been appointed.
Busega Scotland has no paid staff in the UK but pays allowances to seven Tanzanian staff, working in the three projects. In 2016 two British couples visited Tanzania to support the project work. Such overseas volunteers are self-funding.
Projects in Tanzania
Family Support Project – provides extremely poor families with opportunities to improve their life chances. The project is operating in two locations, supporting about seventy families, providing business grants and loans, health insurance and assisting two women’s groups. The original project is based on the fishing industry in the town of Igombe and the new project, which started in November, supports agriculture in the village of Chole.
Mayega Children’s Centre – is a children’s home for up to twenty-four vulnerable children and young people in dormitory accommodation. There are currently fourteen residents, as older members have moved to the Moving-on Project. The children at Mayega are assured of a caring environment and their needs are met in terms of food, clothing, health and education. In 2016 a second building was completed. This has a community room for dining, schoolwork and social activities. The physical security of the site was also improved by erecting a perimeter fence.
Moving-on Project – provides accommodation, social, emotional, practical and educational support for young people, who have completed their secondary education and left the Mayega Children’s Centre. Five young people joined the project in 2016. In total, there are now seven young people in college, following vocational courses in primary teaching, secretarial studies and motor mechanics. The aim of the project is to support the transition from care to independence and employment.
Finance
Busega Scotland supports the three Tanzanian projects by fundraising in many different ways. There have been events (e.g. a sponsored walk and quiz nights), a pop-up charity shop, one-off and regular donations and grants.
In the period 1st July 2015 to 30th November 2016 Busega Scotland had an income of £35,054. This included Gift Aid claimed on appropriate donations. The expenditure in the same period was £28,774, with the vast majority of the funds utilised in Tanzania.
Local costs were minimised, and comprised mainly of expenses for fundraising activities and charges for money transfer to Tanzania. There was a one off legal fee in setting up the Busega Scotland bank account. One loan for a capital project was received and paid back.
Brexit has impacted on the value of funds transferred, with a 20% fall in the value of the pound sterling against the Tanzanian shilling. Busega Scotland has been careful to take this factor into account when transferring money.
Funds are transferred to Tanzania in accordance with need at any given time. Transfers are sanctioned by Busega Scotland in consultation with Tanzanian colleagues. Expenditure varies month by month.
Busega Scotland holds funds in a Tanzanian bank account. At 30th November there was a balance of 9,038,367/- (Tanzanian shillings). That is equivalent to £3,615, at a nominal exchange rate of 2,500/- per pound sterling.
Busega Scotland trustees receive monthly financial reports, covering UK and Tanzanian income and expenditure and trends against budget.
The Busega Scotland accounts have been submitted for independent review in accordance with the requirements of the Scottish Charity Regulator.
Challenges and Opportunities
As with any charitable organisation there is a need to maintain fundraising, and the impact of Brexit is an additional pressure.
Care is taken to communicate Busega Scotland’s positive impacts on lives in Tanzania, to inform supporters and maintain their loyalty. Communication is by newsletters, presentations and through a website.
Talks have been given to a variety of different groups, to raise the profile of Busega Scotland and the work it undertakes. These will continue.
There has been progress with the financial model adopted by Busega Scotland – to seek recurrent donations to underpin day to day project expenditure, while fundraising for capital and larger costs. Such major expenditure is only sanctioned when the funding is in place. The current balance of income over expenditure provides some security for regular spending.
In 2017 there will be a greater emphasis on seeking funds from grant-making bodies and new sources of income will be developed. Local costs will continue to be kept to a minimum, so maximising the funds available for use in Tanzania.
Operational priorities have been agreed for the Tanzanian projects in 2017 and these include:
Family Support Project – consolidating of the project at Chole by increasing the capital available to the women’s group for business loans.
Mayega Children’s Centre – a specific development plan has been agreed to improve educational attainment (including dedicated teacher time at the centre), to admit and integrate new children and install a piped water supply.
Moving-on Project – establish three new students in their college courses.
Conclusions
The first year of operation of Busega Scotland has been a success.
The charity has an increasing profile and has supported many vulnerable people and families in Tanzania.
It is addressing and achieving its charitable purposes.
Its finances are well managed and are reported to trustees on a regular basis.
Productive methods of partnership working have been established in two vastly different working environments.
The charity has created positive collaborations in achieving both its charitable purposes and in adding to the social, educational and cultural life of Moray.
The positive impacts in Tanzania are communicated to trustees, supporters and the general public in a very direct and accountable manner.
Press coverage has been good.
Busega Scotland has become a credible and respected charity at home and overseas.
John Carney, Chair of Busega Scotland, 17th January 2017.